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Alabama, United States
Instructional Specialist, National Board Certified Teacher in Literacy, Graduate School Student, Social Media Promoter for VocabularySpellingCity, Promethean ActivInstructor and Social Media Council member, Avid Twitter @WhiteheadsClass, 2nd Vice President for ALNBCT Network Board of Directors, Certified ALEX Trainer

Saturday, February 18, 2012

WiiMote Interactive Whiteboard

Does someone ever mention something to you, and your curiosity level rises? That is what happened when Carrie posted on my Facebook page asking for help in using a WiiMote as an interactive whiteboard. 


I have never heard of using a WiiMote as an interactive whiteboard option. Who would think such things were even possible? For under $100 (minus the projector), you can have everything you need to create an interactive whiteboard. In my Google search, I found this {post}. The author, Johnny Chung Lee, gives step-by-step directions, the software download, and a Youtube video that shows the WiiMote in use. He also gives you money saving tips on creating the tools you will need. He even shows you how to make an interactive table using the program!


I am super excited about this find. Do any of you use the WiiMote as an interactive whiteboard? I would love to hear from you!
~Cara
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3 comments:

kilgosclass said...

A few months ago my coworker, Christie was going to do this and was on the verge of setting it up when I told her about the splashtop app. She did that instead.

Betsey Dixon said...

I love it!! That is the neatest thing ever! Thanks!

Sam Jephson said...

It is a pretty smart idea to use the WiiMote as an interactive whiteboard. I also saw Johnny Chung Lee’s post about using the WiiMote’s infrared sensor as a detector for an interactive whiteboard. But the problem I see is that lots of IWB users are teachers, and they probably don’t have the time or the resources to build one. Another problem I see is this: what happens when the WiiMote suddenly stops working because it was improperly built? Teachers don’t want to be interrupted in the middle of their lesson because it would greatly affect the learning of the students.